Text Size:SmallerNormalLargerPrint PageE-mail Page

About

Patient Info

Services

Staff

Contact Us

FAQ's


FAQ's

Do I need a referral?

This depends on your insurance. Our clinical staff will work with you to determine coverage.

I don't have insurance, what are my options?

We have a set cash-based payment schedule and can decide on a plan that will work for your situation.

Can you diagnose and treat a concerning mole or skin growth?

Absolutely, we have a wide variety of diagnostic and treatment tools available. This ranges from a simple biopsy to large excisions with skin grafts. Our oncology department is always available if need be.

When should I get checked for skin cancer and what types of spots are concerning?

The Skin Cancer Foundation recommends an annual skin exam by a trained provider. If you have a spot or an area of your skin that is constantly irritated, bleeds, or has changed in size, shape, and/or color it should be evaluated as soon as possible.

Are skin cancers common?

Skin cancers are the most common cancer. 40% to 50% of fair skinned people will develop skin cancer by the age of 65. This rate is likely higher in Arizona due to a multitude of factors including higher elevation, being closer to the equator and a warm climate the majority of the year.

What kinds of skin problems do you treat?

We are able to offer a comprehensive service that allows us to diagnose and treat a multitude of skin conditions with some of the most common being:

Skin Cancer
Acne
Atopic Dermatitis
Herpes
Melasma
Molluscum
Rosacea
Eczema
Skin Growths
Psoriasis
Skin Infections
Rashes
Hair loss
Excessive Perspiration
Vitiligo
Nail Disorders
Scars and Keloids
Warts

What services do I need to see a Board Certified Dermatologist for?

We are currently unable to provide MOHS surgery and certain treatmetns such as Laser therapy

Is it OK for me to see a Physician Assistant (PA) or Nurse Practitioner (NP) for my skin health?

A NP or PA who has trained under the supervision of a dermatologist will have extensive knowledge and experience when it comes to treating skin conditions.

WHEN SHOULD I START GETTING TOTAL BODY SKIN EXAMS?


We typically recommend you start having routine yearly skin exams by the age of 35. However, if you have a family of skin cancer, a history of tanning, or have lesions that are concerning, you should go ahead and make an appointment.

SHOULD MY KIDS HAVE SKIN EXAMS?

Pediatricians are excellent resources for evaluating worrisome lesions. However, if your child's pediatrician has any concerns, your child has an abnormal birthmark, or you want a second opinion, one of our dermatology professionals would be happy to evaluate your child.

HOW OFTEN SHOULD I COME FOR MY SKIN EXAM?

For patients who don't have a history of skin cancer or abnormal moles, we recommend an in-office skin exam once a year. Those who have numerous concerning lesions or a history of skin cancer may need to come more often.

I DON'T HAVE ANYTHING WORRISOME. WHY SHOULD I COME?

Having a skin exam isn't just for worrisome lesions. A dermatology professional can also check hard-to-see areas, such as your scalp, back, and other difficult-to-assess locations. Moreover, dermatology professionals have a trained eye and can identify lesions that may have concerning features even if the lesion looks "normal" to you.

CAN I JUST CHECK MYSELF AT HOME?

Monthly self-skin exams are a great idea. See this guide on how to conduct a home self-skin exam. However, it is still important to be evaluated at least once a year by a dermatology professional. https://www.skincancer.org/early-detection/self-exams/

I NEVER GO IN THE SUN. WHY DO I NEED AN EXAM?

While ultraviolet radiation does play a large role in the development of skin cancer, skin cancers can also arise in skin that has not had much, or any, sun exposure such as the scalp, groin, or bottom of the feet. There is also a genetic component that can predispose otherwise unlikely individuals to skin cancer. Yes. While melanoma can develop out of a pre-existing mole, it statistically appears more often in a new site, or "de novo." Melanoma can also affect your eye, nails, or other parts of your body where you don't think of having moles.

WHAT SHOULD I EXPECT DURING A SKIN EXAM?

Typically, you will be chaperoned to a private patient room and be given a gown or drape. You may undress to your level of comfort. For many people, this means removing all clothing except for undergarments. However, some people prefer to remove undergarments as well.

Your dermatology provider will carefully and intentionally review all areas of your body, including your scalp, face, ears, eyelids, lips, neck, chest, abdomen, back, arms, legs, hands and feet, including nails. You may request an exam of the breasts, groin, and buttock or you may decline.

Your provider will point out and discuss any concerning lesions as well as answer any questions you may have about what something is, what changes to watch out for, and what skin care regimen is appropriate for your skin type and needs. Be sure to ask your provider when you need to come back for another evaluation.

CAN I WEAR MAKEUP TO MY SKIN EXAM APPOINTMENT?

While you may wear makeup, even light makeup can obscure what your dermatology provider sees on exam. Therefore, we encourage you to remove your makeup prior to your appointment and reapply if desired before leaving.

I DON'T WANT TO UNDRESS. CAN I STILL HAVE AN EXAM?

Your dermatology provider will never pressure you to undress or expose yourself in a way that makes you feel uncomfortable. However, it is important to undress for a thorough exam, as concerning lesions can affect any area of the skin, including hard-to-see or non-sun-exposed places.

I HAVE DARK SKIN. DO I STILL NEED A SKIN EXAM?

Yes. While darker skin types have more natural protection, they are not exempt from getting skin cancer. A little known fact is that the famous reggae singer Bob Marley died at the age of 36 from a melanoma under his nail that metastasized.